Posted March 3, 2014 by Daniel Archibald-Jones in Information & Articles
 
 

How To Fill A Clearomizer

A clearomizer as the first part of its name suggests is a transparent version of a cartomizer, however they are not necessarily built in the same way. Their big advantages are that the user is able to see exactly how much e-juice they have left as well as gaining an insight into how the vaping process actually works. A clearomizer also enables the user to see at first hand the quality of the wick.

Clearomizers come in all different kinds of shapes and sizes; however the process for filling them is fairly standard. The first step would usually be to remove a couple of caps – one from the bottle of the e-liquid and also the filter cap or drip tip on the clearomizer itself. There will be holes on the clearomizer which can lead to a common mistake – do not pour e-juice into the middle. This is a tube and its purpose is for airflow. The e-juice should be inserted into one of the outer holes – insert the bottle tip with the tip angled towards the side (some products differ and will feature the use of a plunger system with a syringe and mixing needle that may need to be assembled).

The e-liquid needs to be slowly squeezed until the tank is full however there are likely to be indicators marked on the side of the tank and the liquid should not be filled past this point. Once the filling process has been completed the drip tip or filter cap needs to be screwed back on or replaced as well as of course the cap on the bottle of e-liquid. A good piece of advice is to then tilt the tank back and forth in order to wet the wicks inside the clearomizer and also to wait one or two minutes before starting to vape as this will allow the e-liquid to feed into the coil.

This process will need to be repeated every time the clearomizer needs to be refilled and it is advisable never to let the e-liquid drop below the .6ml line before doing so. A couple of pieces of final advice – avoid oil based e-liquids such as peppermint, clove or cinnamon as these are likely to cause damage to the clearomizer within a space of hours and if the clearomizer gives a burnt taste when inhaling, it is likely to be connected to a problem with the wicks – a simple re-wetting of the wicks should solve the problem.


Daniel Archibald-Jones

 
Daniel Archibald-Jones